Depressive symptoms post-stroke are independently associated with poorer perceived recovery outcomes within the first year

Miss Katherine Sewell1,2, Professor Leeanne Carey1,2, Dr Tamara Tse1

1La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, 2The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract:

Aim:
Our aim was to evaluate the independent association of depressive symptoms and stroke survivors’ perceived recovery outcomes within the first year post-stroke.

Method:
168 stroke survivors were assessed at baseline, three- and twelve-months post-stroke. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and perceived recovery was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale’s Visual Analogue Scale (SIS-VAS). Quantile regressions were conducted for SIS-VAS at the .25, median and .75 quantiles. The model was adjusted for the covariates – age at stroke onset, sex of the individual and initial stroke severity.

Result:
The presence of depressive symptoms at 3 months post-stroke was significantly and negatively associated with perceived recovery at 3 months post-stroke at each quantile (p<0.00) and at 12 months post-stroke at the median (p=0.04) and .75 quantile (p=0.02). Similarly, depressive symptoms at 12 months post-stroke was significantly and negatively associated with perceived recovery at 12 months post-stroke at each quantile (p<0.00).

Significance of findings to allied health:
Post-stroke depression is known to negatively impact functional recovery outcomes, frequently determined by measures of disability and dependence. Our findings demonstrate the impact of depressive symptoms on perceived recovery post-stroke and highlight the importance of considering recovery beyond the conventional use of clinical measures of function and neurological examinations – where it currently appears to be embedded. Further, perceived recovery is of particular significance given the widely adopted healthcare approach of patient-centred care.

Biography:

Katherine Sewell is a PhD student at La Trobe University and an honorary student at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health.

Research interests include: stroke rehabilitation, stroke recovery outcomes, perceived health and post-stroke depression.

Katherine has a Master of Public Health (The University of Melbourne, 2016); a Graduate Diploma of Youth Mental Health (The University of Melbourne, 2014); a Bachelor in Psychological Sciences (La Trobe University, 2013) and a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (La Trobe University, 2012).